General Health Resources

  • CMS and the National Committee on Quality Assurance have released a toolkit aimed at improving health care for minorities and at-risk populations, including people with limited English proficiency, sexual minorities and people with disabilities. The toolkit is suitable for use in a healthcare setting and in community settings that are not clinical, but focused on improving health.

Medical Card

  • The Illinois Department of Health and Family Services (DHFS) offers information on obtaining medical cards for babies. DHFS’s web site has a Medical Program Brochures Numerical Listing page where you will find the following forms for your use:
    • Form HFS 469I – How to Get a Medical Card and Primary Care Provider (PCP) for Your Baby (English)
    • Form HFS 4691S – How to Get a Medical Card and Primary Care Provider (PCP) for Your Baby (Spanish)

Medical Home

  • The Illinois Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics provides resources about medical homes in relation to home visiting services.

Well-Child Care Visits

  • The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) developed a set of comprehensive health guidelines for well-child care, called Bright Futures, for pediatricians to follow. Each well-child visit has an age-appropriate pre-visit questionnaire that are designed for parents. Click here for Bright Futures and the age-appropriate pre-visit questionnaires.

Reproductive Health

  • The Governor’s Office of Early Childhood Development (OECD) partnered with the Illinois Department of Human Services (DHS) Maternal Child Health nurses to record a series of webinars on health related topics important to home visitors, including Reproductive Planning and Preconception Care and Contraception. Please click here for these resources.
  • Bedsider.org is an online birth control support network for women 18-29 operated by The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, a private non-profit organization. The Bedsider website offers information about methods of birth control, where to get birth control, and an app for birth control reminders.

Child Immunizations

  • Click here to view the most up-to-date immunization schedules provided by the American Academy of Pediatrics.
  • OECD partnered with the DHS Maternal Child Health nurses to record a series of webinars on health related topics important to home visitors, including Immunizations and Well Child Visits. Please click here for these resources.

Behavioral and Mental Health

  • Maternal Depression and Social Supports
    • Mothers and Babies Program at Northwestern University is a program that promotes healthy mood, bonding with one’s baby, and strategies for pregnant women and new moms to cope with stress in their lives. Mothers and Babies can be implemented one-on-one or in a group setting. Its website offers resources about maternal depression, including curricula applicable to its program.
  • Emotional Wellness
    • The American Academy of Pediatrics offers a variety of articles about emotional wellness and building resilience in children.

Dental and Oral Health

  • OECD partnered with the DHS Maternal Child Health nurses to record a series of webinars on health related topics important to home visitors, including dental and oral health. Please click here for these resources.
  • The American Academy of Pediatrics offers a variety of resources pertaining to oral health.
  • Click here for a tip sheet for home visitors that was prepared by Katrina Holt, MPH, MS, RD, FAND (Director of the National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center at Georgetown University) and published by HV-Impact. The tip sheet outlines ways home visitors can promote oral health among the children and families they work with, and offers links to some additional resources.

Hearing and Vision

 

Substance and Tobacco Use

  • 4P’s Plus© is the only validated screening instrument specifically designed to quickly identify obstetrical patients at risk for use of tobacco, alcohol, or illicit drugs. For the past several years, NTI Upstream has been involved in developing and validating a screening methodology that will identify pregnant women at risk for alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drug use. The 4P’s Plus© is a five-question screen specifically designed to quickly identify obstetrical patients in need of in-depth assessment or follow up monitoring. Taking less than one minute, it easily can be integrated into the initial prenatal visit and used for follow up screening through the pregnancy. The questions are broad-based and highly sensitive. For additional information on the 4P’s Plus© including a short training video and how to order books go to NTI Upstream. If you are a MIECHV home visitor, ask your Infant Mental Health Consultant for information on 4P’s Plus© training within your program.

Nutrition

  • The American Academy of Pediatrics offers a variety of articles about good nutrition for children.

Safe Sleep

  • AAP Recommendations – The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) released in October 2016 new safe sleep recommendations to protect against SIDS (Sleep-Related Infant Deaths). Information on the new recommendations can be accessed by clicking here.
  • B’more Babies Safe Sleep Campaign – B’more for Healthy Babies is built on the realization that reducing infant deaths will happen only if people throughout the community play a part. The Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Program implemented a communication campaign across the city of Baltimore to share messages about infant safety and family health to all residents of Baltimore. Click here to watch a short video that was part of the safe sleep campaign.
  • The Safe to Sleep® campaign is led by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), part of the National Institutes of Health, within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. To learn more about the campaign or ordering materials, please click here.

Breastfeeding

  • The National Breastfeeding Help Line is 1-800-994-9662. English and Spanish speaking peer counselors are available to answer common breastfeeding questions. The U.S. Office on Women’s Health staffs the help line and also provides a variety of other resources related to breastfeeding that can be accessed by clicking here.
  • The federal Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) prepared or compiled a series of resources to support pregnant and parenting young people in breastfeeding, including the following:
    • A recorded 90-minute webcast panel, “Effective Counseling, Referral, and Systems to Support Breastfeeding in Young People: A Look at Successful Practices in Health Care Settings” and related slides
      • Bibliography of articles focused on adolescents and breastfeeding
  • In Illinois, there is a Statewide Breastfeeding Task Force (SBTF) and Regional Breastfeeding Task Forces. Click here for a directory and contact information on these task forces. The website for the SBTF offers a number of resources, including professional development and a description of Illinois breastfeeding laws.
  • The federal WIC (Women, Infants, and Children) program in Illinois offers resources and information on breastfeeding, including this flyer in English and Spanish. Click here for a listing of the WIC breastfeeding coordinators in Illinois.

Zika Virus

  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released a fact sheet and a report describing its latest findings on the Zika infection in pregnant women and babies, and the importance of prevention and early care.
    • The report includes an analysis of the nearly 1,300 pregnant women with evidence of possible Zika infection who were reported in 44 states in 2016. Most of these women acquired the Zika virus infection during travel to an area with Zika. The report is the first to provide the analysis of a subgroup of pregnant women in the U.S. with clear, confirmed test results of the Zika virus infection. Among pregnant women with confirmed Zika infection, about 1 in 10 had a fetus or baby with birth defects. Confirmed infections in the first trimester posed the highest risk – with about 15% having Zika-related birth defects. The report also highlights current gaps for evaluating and managing infants with possible congenital Zika virus infection. About 1 in 3 babies with possible congenital Zika infection were not reported to have been tested for Zika at birth, and only 1 in 4 babies with possible congenital Zika infection were reported to have received recommended brain imaging after birth. The CDC’s findings underscore the importance of protecting pregnant women from the Zika virus infection and among affected babies and the need for continued and follow-up care.
    • Additional resources from the CDC on the Zika virus can be found at its website.

This website is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number HRSA-16-172 Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program – Formula. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.